8/06/2006

Public education is a vision thing



24 comments:

Cato said...

Those computers on every desk are a waste of resources.

I assume at that very moment they are using some propogandizing software "explaining" the gloriousness of debt-money, FDR or the UN.

1,000 Words said...

Cato:

I'm with you there. After reading the article in the St. Paul paper yesterday about the disconnect between high school standards and college entrance expectations, I'm thinking there's a lot to be said about Ziller's vision wear. Pen and paper on the desks. You can do your homework on a computer or in a specific lab. If that is supposed to be a high school english class, if should see a book and/or paper with pens in hand.

If they ain't learning the reading, writing and rithmatic part of education, what the help are they learning?

Cato said...

There is value in computers, and from a pragmatic view children should learn to use them. But do that in certian classes on just how to use the tool. We didn't have children sitting with typewriters on their desks, or word processers for that matter, years ago. Typing is important, and so is learning software basics, but far more important is reading comprehension, grammar and writing.

For reading large amounts of material, I perfer a book anyway. Easier on the eyes.

AndyRand said...

If you take their computers away, how will they be able to keep their "My Space" profiles up to date? Denying students that would truely be tragic. They may have to interact in person like real humans.

Cato said...

I lol'ed.

1,000 Words said...

I suppose they have wireless networks. This will eliminate the need to pass notes in class and that should free the teachers up to spent more time on educational content and less time on policing the love life of students.

Cato said...

Children couldn't listen to this without a computer. Or a radio and the will to wake up early I suppose...

http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=5622900

Sorry, it was too funny (until you realize it's true)/disturbing to NOT post somewhere...

Cato said...

Bah....

http://tinyurl.com/l3jsm

AndyRand said...

Just when you think you've heard it all.............

CATO: Are you saying these people are
"Rational" Beings?

Cato said...

Rational beings can behave irrationally. Just because you posses the capacity to reason or to be moral does not mean you actually use said capacity.

AndyRand said...

Agreed. But..


I really don't want to get into a big
back and forth with you about this.
But, in the minds of the people in the news story, they were acting morally.
I have to wonder about their capacity to reason as well or at least ask "What the hell are they thinking?" I think you might also.

Cato said...

Well they are wrong and acting immorally.

AndyRand said...

So you're in favor of goats exposing their genitals? :-)

Cato said...

Whatever blows yer goat... err, floats yer boat.

666 said...

This brings a whole new meaning to "pulling the wool over your eye."

AndyRand said...

Back to schools. Do you think there's an over emphasis on technology for technology's sake?

AndyRand said...

Just think of the life saving entrepenaurial opportunity in Iraqi Goat fashion. It could become an Iraqi
Pop Culture Phenomenon, a whole chain of Ishmail's Secret Shops.

1,000 Words said...

Myself, I don't see a need for an english classroom to have desks with laptops. Typing/keyboardings class is different. However, my guess is its a rare kid how does know how to type -- these days -- by the time they get to high school. I also think the memory process is strenghten with the physical involvement among pen, paper and the brain. Jeez, using a laptop in class would suck -- how could a guy doodle and draw super heroes and other stuff?

I was rather amazed by the story in the SPP yesterday where it said the girl basically spent her senior year in a on-the-job training program for a store like Herbergers. Just get a part time job after school -- especially if her plan was to go on to college. A store clerk? That's entry level stuff that you do on your own time or wait till you graduate. Is that so way for school districts to count a student on the state aid roles who isn't actually in school?

Cato said...

Good god 666...

Andy, yes, I believe there is. Technology is a useful tool. But one should not structure life around it.

1,000 words said...

I think there are too many accessories in life in general. More and more I see a need to return to the basics and make that the emphasis.

AndyRand said...

CATO said:

"Andy, yes, I believe there is. Technology is a useful tool. But one should not structure life around it."

Surprisingly, we agree. But my point was a little more specific. I believe that so much attention is given to the technology that it's use as a communications tool is lost and it becomes an end in itself, especially to those who are enamored by technology (like myself). And to the technologically challenged it becomes a threat.

1,000 Words said...

From the context of education:

Computers don't write papers, students do. The should be able to write papers on papers and learn how to physically proof read and edit their papers. Computers are definately useful for this, but you have to have the basics down.

1 + 1 = 2 is basic math, but you need to be able to do this on paper and in your head before you pull up a spreadsheet and let it do the math.

It this sense, computers are an accessory that comes later in the education program.

AndyRand said...

1K....

If you are talking about the use of computers in Elementary school I think we are all on the same page. There should be some exposure, but computers should not be central to learning. However, in higher grades and
higher ed. computers can allow access to much more information much more readily. But caution needs to be taken that the tool doesn't overshadow learning.

Anonymous said...

Cato
I've questioned you on other issues, but on this topic I agree with you.